Liposuction for medical and beauty reasons

The original surgery was definitely medically necessary, but this surgery was not. She did it because she didn’t like “looking like a freak” (her words) and wanted to look normal. I can see her point. I don’t think she was not sane just because she had the surgery for strictly aesthetic reasons.

 

She is a beautiful person all over, her features did not detract from that in any way, even physically she was/is a beautiful lady… she just wanted to look normal for her own sake. It is different from people getting a potentially dangerous operation like a tummy tuck or lipo, though not much. I just don’t agree that people who have surgery for reasons other than medical necessity are “not in the sane category”, though I do see lea’s point since she sees the surgery up close and personal, whereas the rest of us (including the patient) see the before and after.

 

Ugh, I almost passed out seeing my comatose niece all covered in tubes and wires and she had no visible injuries. I can’t imagine seeing … well, surgery. No, there isn’t much difference. The feelings are all the same, feeling abnormal because that person does not look like everyone else. For her, it was not medically necessary, since it did not affect her health or breathing. It was a desire to look “normal”.

 

I don’t think I would do it either, but then, if I lived my whole life looking “different”, I might feel differently. Who knows? I do know that I don’t at all like the way I look, but while a quick fix surgery may sound ideal, if I had the money, I still wouldn’t do it. Funny (not ha ha funny, weird funny)… I would refuse to have surgery but I’m willing to torture myself with ed behaviors that are just as potentially dangerous as surgery is.

Fitting into a sports bra

I would like some info on some GOOD sports bras for women who are in the larger cup sizes..(D cups and up). I can’t seem to find a decent sports bra that fits well and has decent support. Any help would be appreciated. I was wearing ones made by Lily of France that Macy’s had carried. They were great, but I can’t seem to find them anymore. Lane Bryant is carrying some now as is Woman’s World. I wear a 46DD and need a 48 in the W.World bra, but could wear a 46 in the Lily and LaneB ones.

 

I like the Lily best though. How about doubling up on bras? I know it’s not ideal, but a friend of mine does this. I think she puts on a very structurally sound bra with underwire, large straps, and so forth under a sports bra. It looked uncomfortable to me. But bouncing does hurt, so perhaps it is the lesser of two evils. It really pisses me off that the sports bra industry seems to think that only small breasted women want to exercise.

 

Like someone with an A cup needs support like a D cup? And I thought I had it bad with merely a C cup. Yes, I agree wholeheartedly. I’m a mere C cup myself, but I have a friend is a 36DD. She can’t find a good sports bra worth beans! I did see an ad for By-Kimberly sport bras that boasted cups sizes B to DD. It said they were at selected Neiman Marcus stores and at Norstrom.

 

I’m not aware of either of these stores existing where I live but they did give an 800 number. Perhaps they could tell you where you might find their bras for the area you are in. The number is 1-800-700-4171. The bras advertised are acutually pleasing to the eye as well.

Book Review article, Coming face to face with cosmetic surgery

By the 1920s, cosmetic surgery had a hold on the imagination of the American public, thanks in large part to the efforts of journalists, who, then as now, were fascinated by its possibilities. In 1923, the famous Jewish comedian Fanny Brice submitted to a much-publicized nose bob in hopes that it would enable her to play a wider range of roles. “Hurrah for the intrepid Fanny,” The New York Times editorialized. (Writer Dorothy Parker, @also Jewish, saw it differently, commenting that Brice had “cut off her nose to spite her race.”)

 

In the 1920s and ’30s, trained plastic surgeons realized the importance of establishing the legitimacy of their specialty and brought it under the auspices of the American Medical Association. The American Board of Plastic Surgery was founded in 1941 to set standards for the profession. In the years between the wars, many plastic surgeons had concentrated on performing reconstructive surgery and were reluctant to operate on patients motivated by vanity. But by the ’40s most had realized that vanity was where the future lay, to say nothing of the money. The doctors were shortly persuaded that these patients weren’t @motivated by (unhealthy) vanity but by a (healthy) desire for self-respect through self-improvement. If a new nose or chin would help them land a job or a husband, the cosmetic surgeon was ready to help. It was, and is, the American way.

 

As Haiken’s research reveals, popular psychology played a crucial role in the triumph of cosmetic surgery. Alfred Adler’s concept of the inferiority complex was much in vogue in the 1930s and ’40s. The cosmetic surgeon was thus seen as serving a psychological @function by helping patients overcome feelings of inferiority engendered by an unattractive appearance. The link between cosmetic surgery and psychology is stronger than ever today. Many patients seek surgery hoping it will improve what we have learned to call self-esteem.

Reason for cosmetic surgery on body

She says she did it for his love. He says she did it because she loves herself. Since Jocelyne and Alec Wildenstein no longer agree on anything, it’s only natural that they would disagree on why she’s had so many face lifts that she’s been dubbed “The Bride of Wildenstein.” “I did it for him,” Jocelyne told The Post. “He wanted me to have a younger appearance,” said the copper-haired mother of two. “He hates to be with old people.” But billionaire art dealer Alec says his estranged wife became a poster girl for plastic surgery because it became an obsession – “or a disease.”

 

“She did it behind my back, or she would tell me an hour before, and then three days later, she would come back with a reconstruction job,” he said. “This happened many times during the last 10 years. … It was against my will.” The Post has obtained dramatic pictures that show how Jocelyne looked before facing the plastic surgeon’s scalpel.

 

Before the surgery, she was a delicate-looking woman with large, round, doe eyes, a small aquiline nose, thin lips and a high forehead. Now her cheeks are rounder, her lips are puffier, her skin is plastic, and her eyes are catlike slits. In fact, some friends say, the 52-year-old Jocelyne loves cats and asked her doctor to make her look feline. Of course, Jocelyne loves other animals, too. She has five Italian greyhounds and a pet monkey.

 

And she and her estranged hubby have a 66,000-acre ranch and game preserve in Kenya. Dr. Victor Rosenberg, director of cosmetic surgery at New York Downtown Hospital, said one round of the surgery Jocelyne has undergone costs roughly $31,000.

Minor cosmetic surgery

I think minor cosmetic surgery at the hands of a very trustworthy trained surgeon could be potentially wonderful. I believe the problem with the “cat woman” is that our surgery technology just doesn’t measure up to most peoples expectations when it comes to more extreme facial mods.We are great at age defying tucks and wrinkle removing but not at totally rearranging ones features to appear to be another species.

 

I mean if she wanted to look like a cat and our medical technology could give her an anime cat look we (or at least I) would think that was really fantastic. As an nurse I can tell you cosmetic surgery can be just as painful as any other surgery during recovery. I hear breast implants and nose jobs are the worst of the lot. But on the other hand if you are worried about your eyes and you can afford it and it would make you feel better. Hell, go for it. It doesn’t really matter what anyone else thinks.

 

If you think you would FEEL better about yourself then it is worth the money and recovery time to not have to think about it when you look in the mirror every day. My best advice is to do your homework regarding your surgeon. Visit several about it. Remember you want the best guy or gal you can find. Ask people you know for referrals. Doing your homework before you get it done can save you some trouble in the long run.

 

I consider minor cosmetic surgery to be no different than tattoos, hair dyes, etc. Sure, it’s more permanent but if you know you want to be that way the rest of your life. . . I think as the technology gets better and safer and easier we will see more and more of this.

Fearing the effects of aging

My basic take on the whole topic is: I think it’s unfortunate for people to feel pressured by fashion, or men, or media, or “Barbie Doll” culture, or whatever, to surgically change their bodies. But given that, if a person truly feels unhappy about some aspect of their looks, I do not castigate them for making the change.

 

A person could get a nose job because they always hated their nose, but I thought the nose looked fine. Who am I to demand that the person retain their look for my benefit and then cast aspersions and psychoanalyze their motives? I lived with that a lot when I was punk (much younger days) and dyed my hair and looked weird. Had to put up with everyone’s theorizing about why I did those things. Maybe it’s not really all that simple.

 

Actually, that’s the same response I heard from a Caucasian woman I knew who’d been through childbirth and one day wanted augmentation. Said it was for her, not her man (or other men). I think the women who want this done get tired of hearing from friends and lovers “you look great, why let society tell you what breast size you should have?” It’s condescending, don’t you think? To answer 2nd half, who knows? I’d guess no….. but what if SHE were blind but rest of world could see, would she have done it to look more attractive to the world? I’d say no.

 

The benefit comes from her seeing herself, has to do with body image, I think. So if I work hard to improve my mind by reading and studying, I’m ultimately doing it to get picked up? Come on! Some people genuinely feel depressed or bad if they let themselves fall apart either physically or intellectually. For those of us raised a certain way, it’s the old Protestant Work Ethic at work. Also, the motivation behind working out or any efforts to improve or maintain one’s overall sharpness often is an age-related thing…fearing the effects of aging.

Orthodontic surgery for improving the appearances

I’m in the process of getting orthodontic braces to correct my teeth. Yes, I had them as a kid, but my teeth are misaligned again because my wisdom teeth came in years after the braces came off, which pushed my teeth out of alignment. When I tell people about the braces, invariably they tell me how great it is that I’m doing something to fix a cosmetic problem that has been bothering me (even though many of the same people can’t see why I’m so bothered by it).

 

No one ever asks if there is a functional problem with my teeth or jaw; they all just assume that I’m looking for dental perfection. It made me wonder what their reactions would be if I said instead that I was getting breast implants or some other kind of cosmetic surgery. I imagine that I wouldn’t get the same reaction. So…what do you all think of cosmetic surgery? Would you have it done? What do you think of people who have been under the knife in an attempt to improve their appearance?

 

I’m in the process of getting orthodontic braces to correct my teeth. Yes, I had them as a kid, but my teeth are misaligned again because my wisdom teeth came in years after the braces came off, which pushed my teeth out of alignment. When I tell people about the braces, invariably they tell me how great it is that I’m doing something to fix a cosmetic problem that has been bothering me (even though many of the same people can’t see why I’m so bothered by it).

 

No one ever asks if there is a functional problem with my teeth or jaw; they all just assume that I’m looking for dental perfection. It made me wonder what their reactions would be if I said instead that I was getting breast implants or some other kind of cosmetic surgery. I imagine that I wouldn’t get the same reaction. So…what do you all think of cosmetic surgery? Would you have it done? What do you think of people who have been under the knife in an attempt to improve their appearance?

Oldage and cosmetic surgery

The older women I most admire, who have the most interesting faces and have had the most interesting lives, haven’t had cosmetic surgery. They may have jowls; they certainly have wrinkles, laugh creases. They’re at peace with themselves and their bodies and their age. They’re beautiful and alive and their faces are mobile, not stretched so tight their eyes are perpetually widened and their faces can’t manage a wide grin. Those who know me know I don’t try to hide the grey in my hair either.

 

Years back, my sister and niece were at the beauty parlor and my niece, age five or so, was fascinated by a woman who was getting her hair colored. “Why?” she asked, and the woman explained it was to cover the grey and make her look younger. My niece replied, “…your hair may look younger, but your face will still be old.” Hamlet said something to the effect that ‘there’s nothing either good nor bad but thinking makes it so.’ If you want some cosmetic surgery, get it.

 

It doesn’t have to be very painful or expensive, and it won’t make all that much difference in your life. It doesn’t have to ‘mean’ anything moral, ethical, philosophical. There’s entirely too much navel-gazing going on in this world, and on MW. Yes, I got some plastic surgery. It cost $2500, which I charged on my MasterCard. I am now exactly the same person, just $2500 poorer and I don’t have big bags under my eyes. It was kind of an adventure in reality; I hired someone to tinker with my appearance. I thought it was fun.

Beauty and cosmetic surgery

If I had the spare cash I would have the surgery. I never really understood why people have such a problem with it. If our houses get shabby, we decorate. If trousers start sagging at the knees we buy new ones. For all the men who are sniggering out there at the thought I have the following argument.

 

If you own a car you are proud of and it gets damaged or starts suffering from the ravages of time, you would have no qualms at forking out the pennies in renovating it. (Particularly for those men who consider their vehicles as a form of penile extension.) So where is the problem in a woman, or man for that matter, spending money on their faces or bodies? After all, we have to carry them around where ever we go don’t we? Why is it considered wrong to want to preserve something that is, ultimately, our most precious possession?

 

No, I’m not being narcissistic, I’m just trying to work out why material possessions are considered more worthy than our own bodies. I appreciate the argument that beauty comes from within, but as everyone knows, our acceptance is, generally speaking, initially evaluated by our external appearance. This can also be true about acceptance of ‘self’. (Self-image can be seriously affected if looking in the mirror sends us running for the paper bag to hide in.) I watched a programmed some time ago, where the plastic surgeon went to great pains to say that the surgery was performed to reflect the best image within the age group of the client.

 

My view on this is – “Forget it Buster, if I’m spending n x 1000′s pounds on this, I want an image that is reminiscent of times gone by (or even one that only exists in my imagination). At least that way I have an opportunity to get my money’s worth before gravity takes hold again.”

Cosmetic surgery for acne

I had severe acne many years ago and I have now scheduled an appt. with a plastic surgeon to discuss options for cosmetic surgery to erase the scarring and wrinkles left from years of acne outbreaks. I was wondering what experiences others have had with cosmetic surgery in this regard.

I’m encouraged by the equal prize split at the event and what that means for the pro women’s tour but I’m also curious about how the rest of the mainstream media will view the cosmetic surgery undergone by a top WPVA player. I was told by a number of event officials that this player (I won’t name her for legal reasons but WPVA watchers from last year who have seen the players this season will know who it is) had breast implants over the winter. To preface my comments, I must say that I believe that the decision to get implants is a personal one and therefore I don’t want to “judge” this player negatively for her decision.

A person’s appearance is very important to a healthy self-esteem and I do not fault anybody for wanting to feel better about their body. But she is a public persona and her actions have a number of ramifications in terms of perception of the sport. Given beach volleyball’s reputation as a “T&A” sport by some media, I am curious whether they will use this fact to continue their stereotype that beach is all image and no athleticism. As well, considering the recent medical horror stories about implants and the physical constraints that a larger bust creates, I am somewhat confused why someone would undertake such an operation at the height of their athletic career.