Cosmetic surgery for increasing the self esteem

I mean, whats the difference between a breast cancer patient that opts for tattoos to cover her mastectomy scar or one that opts for surgical implants to replace the breast. Both are simply ways to alter those women’s bodies so that they feel better about themselves. I saw a woman in a tattoo magazine that had some beautiful colorful flowers in the vague shape of ovaries and uterus tattooed on her lower abdomen.

 

She just had a full hysterectomy and felt the tattooed helped her accept the new changes to her body. A woman that has four children and has an abdomen that is all stretched out may go get a tummy tuck so she feels she can wear shorts or a swim suit again.It doesn’t matter what people decide to do to themselves. What matters is that it makes them happy and helps them feel comfortable with themselves.

 

I have friends that have had breast implants and now wear lower cut blouses and feel great. They felt the risks were acceptable in light of the gain to their self image. An all over body tattoo or large back piece is just as permanent and often provides its wearer similar benefits of boosted self esteem and a better body image. I was aware of the implants but they are not what I really want for myself. You can get subdermal implants in the form of bumps of various sorts.

 

But I would like a technology that is more of a bone graft I guess. I have seen great subdermal ridges created and the one gentleman with the subdermal screws on the top of his skull that allow him to put on spikes in the form of a mowhawk-ish look. I am fond of them all. I guess I just want more. I want an implant that lies partially outside the skin. The implants they are doing don’t do that. But there will always be those people that push the limits of technology and I suppose that it is only a matter of time. But then its all about our own fantasies of self and how we want to look.

Benefits of cosmetic eye surgery

The after care directions were easy. sleep with eye shields on for 2 weeks so you don’t accidentally rub your eyes. I put in antibiotic drops several times a day for the same 2 weeks and for a month after that I just used regular eye drops to keep my eyes moist. The biggest part was not to fuss with my eyes. I took a nap in my hotel room and woke up about 2 hours later. I could see!!! I could read street signs on the street below. 24 floors below.

 

I called my friends from the hotel room ecstatic! I went back to work two days after with no problems but trying to push up my non existent glasses for the next three months. Now when I wake up I can see the clock next to me! I can wear really cool eyeliner and makeup and people can actually see it! Medically the risks are very minimal and if you do not get the correction you want you can do it again.

 

The Lasik clinic in Vancouver BC that I went to offered the pre op exam, the procedure, and three post op exams for $1200. Both eyes and a guarantee that if you do not get the correction you want to your vision then you could get it corrected again for free. I never realized what a difficulty it was to wear glasses until i didn’t have to. No more fogging up the lenses. I have probably saved at least the cost of the procedure in glasses and contact lens costs in the last 5 years since having it done.

 

My husband’s procedure went the exact same as mine and consequently I have about 5 friends and former coworkers that have had it done because of my success. I would not have ever gotten it done if a friend of mine’s brother hadn’t had it done first. He called me from his hotel room afterwards and cried about how happy he was to be able to see! It was the best money investment of my life. I have a very active life and I can now swim freely with out worrying about contacts and glasses. I would do it again in a heart beat.

Cosmetic surgery to improve vision

I was nervous and scared as hell as I have real emotional hangups about my eyes being touched. So jittery, doesn’t even cover it. They gave me 1mg of Ativan that I wished was more to keep me calm. They said I would be in and out of surgery in less than 20 minutes and that most of that is the set up. Boy, they weren’t kidding.

 

I was led into a room and my husband was allowed to come in with me and hold my hand the whole time. I laid down on a table and they prepped me with some anesthetic eye drops and set me up in the machine. I have to say if you are squeamish don’t watch it done first because it looks far worse than it feels. The laser used makes a loud “pak pak” noise and that was the scariest part for me. I kept anticipating pain but there wasn’t any.

 

They use a pressure ring on your eye that is uncomfortable but wasn’t terribly bad. It feels like “ick oh there is something in my eye.” not the screaming ouch you would think. I can’t stress enough that it wasn’t bad at all. The worse part of it all was my anticipating the possibility of pain. My husbands surgery several months later was even easier because he knew what he was in for and didn’t worry as much I suspect. My eye surgery was 28 seconds on one eye and 49 on the other.

 

You could smell that laser in use but I felt nothing and they walked me over to the recovery room where I laid with my eyes closed and drank orange juice for 20 minutes. Not bad. I was given the ugliest sunglasses on the planet to wear whenever I was outside until I got my own. My husband walked me to our hotel of which I was glad he was there as my eyes were watery and I could have made it on my own but its nice not to.

Cat Eyes: Facial Cosmetic Surgery

Has anyone here considered cosmetic surgery? I’ve always had very noticeable creases underneath my eyes and the look has always bothered me. I started wondering how much it would cost to have the skin under my eyes tightened, and in the process I decided that, if I ever do have cosmetic surgery, I might as well go all the way…which brings me to the following point: I have always wanted to have Asian looking eyes (I saw one show on cosmetic surgery where they called it “cat eyes”).

 

If I ever have the money to do this (and I should in a year or two, while I’m in college) I want to get it done. Has anyone here fantasized about this or actually done it, or knew someone who did? There is some woman who has had extensive plastic surgery to make her look like her cat and she seriously looks gross. If you want to get the almond-shaped eyes look, you can always pull your hair back in a tight ponytail and not have to worry about pissing away thousands of dollars for a really messed-up looking face.

 

Ah, yes! I have the same creases, and I have been thinking about it lately. But, I have really mixed feelings about this. Some people still manage to find me attractive despite this “flaw.” I’m sure it looks 1,000,000 times more pronounced to me than it does to anyone else. But then I think, if it will boost my confidence and make me look less tired, maybe I should. If you look carefully and pay attention, you may notice that many people (even models-gasp!) have these same creases. Besides, those little oddities are part of what makes us unique.

RA and cosmetic surgery

I feel grateful to have eyes and I’m just plain grateful to be alive. but i am so tired of having surgeries and other invasive procedures to mend this and that when the real surgery I’d like to have is on my eyes. not lasik, which i know is a no-no with ra, but a reduction of puffiness/bagginess. I was first told my eyes “always look tired” when i was in my 20′s, so you can imagine how perky i look at 52. i do a moderate amount of public speaking and TV spots as well.

 

I am wondering if there are contraindications to having cosmetic surgery if you have ra? i suppose the use of immunosuppressant drugs is a problem, but no more so than any other type of surgery.This kind of surgery can do more to improve your looks with less problem than just about any kind of cosmetic surgery. What is cool is that if it is bad enough to interfere with your vision, insurance will even pay for it. Get into a good eye surgeon and find out what your options are.

 

Just that it takes longer to heal, there is a greater risk of infection, and having RA may alter the way you develop scar tissue. However, the best ones to discuss this with would be your Rd and the plastic surgeon. Hey, I think you should go for it. In the last two I watched to face lifts and two lipos on the Life channel. If I could afford it I would go for it.. I have inherited baggy eyes. I’ve had them my entire life. So does my twin. It sucks, and I’ve been so self conscious about it always. And yup, I can’t stand it when people say, “Gee Di, you look so tired.” The only reason I have not gone for the surgery is the money.

 

Supposedly, it costs a couple thousand bucks, and I’ve never had enough to just part with that kind of money The whole thing with any procedure is informed consent. Know the risks and go form there.

Cosmetic surgery on eye

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons there were 142,000 blepharoplasties performed in 1999 — a number that has more than doubled in the seven years since the ASPS began to keeping count. And now, thanks to greater availability and a cultural (some argue ingrained) preference for larger eyes, eyelid surgery has become the most popular surgery in the Asia-Pacific region. Demand is highest among Korean, Chinese, and Japanese women, though anecdotal accounts point to rising numbers of Asian men requesting the surgery. “Eyes that are done look better,” insists Silvia Kim, who operates a Korean cosmetics counter in Flushing, Queens.

 

“The crease brings out the eyelashes and makes the eyes look bigger,” she says, emphasizing the size difference with her thumb and forefinger. Critics of eyelid surgery believe it is a cosmetic cop-out for Asian Americans who want to downplay their race, since all Caucasians and most non-Asians are born with the crease. Still others argue personal confidence is the issue, since an estimated fifty percent of Asians are also born with the eyelid fold. But Asians have been characterized by their eyes more than any other feature by Westerners (think Fu Manchu-style caricatures and slant-eye miming in the schoolyard.

 

This deep-rooted, racist cultural imagery makes it somewhat impossible not to see the widespread effort to alter this trait as a reaction. as well as a statement about the effects of Westernization on Asian Americans. Those who oppose the surgery fault the pervasive influence of American culture on women’s self-esteems worldwide, especially with the expanding reach of the Internet. Theoretically, globalization of the media over the past few decades should have fostered a diversity of images, the result of a two-way transmission of cultures — and body types.

 

But some believe the marketing power of Hollywood, coupled with a Western tradition of colonialism, has sown cultural insecurity among Asians and other groups. “It’s terrible that global culture has made the Western standard of beauty so predominant that Asian women feel they have to go under the knife to achieve that standard,” says Dina Gan, editor-in-chief of A magazine, the nation’s widest-circulation Asian American publication.

Eyes That Are Done Look Better

Critics of eyelid surgery believe it is a cosmetic cop-out for Asian Americans who want to downplay their race, since all Caucasians and most non-Asians are born with the crease. Still others argue personal confidence is the issue, since an estimated fifty percent of Asians are also born with the eyelid fold. But Asians have been characterized by their eyes more than any other feature by Westerners (think Fu Manchu-style caricatures and slant-eye miming in the schoolyard.)

 

This deep-rooted, racist cultural imagery makes it somewhat impossible not to see the widespread effort to alter this trait as a reaction as well as, a statement about the effects of Westernization on Asian Americans. Those who oppose the surgery fault the pervasive influence of American culture on women’s self-esteems worldwide, especially with the expanding reach of the Internet.

 

Theoretically, globalization of the media over the past few decades should have fostered a diversity of images, the result of a two-way transmission of cultures — and body types. But some believe the marketing power of Hollywood, coupled with a Western tradition of colonialism, has sown cultural insecurity among Asians and other groups.

 

“It’s terrible that global culture has made the Western standard of beauty so predominant that Asian women feel they have to go under the knife to achieve that standard,” says Dina Gan, editor-in-chief of A magazine, the nation’s widest-circulation Asian American publication. Gan also believes the transmission of media — and beauty standards — has been unilateral. “You never hear about Caucasian women having their eyes done to look Asian,”